administrator of NASA, Jim Brindenstine: “Today, we successfully landed on Mars for the eighth time in human history,” 

InSight: After six years, a space probe landed again on Mars.

Throughout these 7 months, the NASA team supervised and controlled the mission.

This is the time of eighth that a space probe lands on Mars, said today the administrator of NASA, Jim Brindenstine:

“Today, we successfully landed on Mars for the eighth time in human history,” 

NASA’s InSight Lander reaches the Martian surface to learn what’s underneath.

The signal for the entire landing process was transmitted to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the city of Pasadena, California, United States.

from fast to slow:

InSight project manager, Tom Hoffman of JPL, said:

We hit the Martian atmosphere at 12,300 mph (19,800 kilometers per hour), and the whole sequence to touching down on the surface took only six-and-a-half minutes,” 

“During that short span of time, InSight had to autonomously perform dozens of operations and do them flawlessly — and by all indications that is exactly what our spacecraft did.”

Landing on Mars has always been very difficult, but that seems to be part of the past.

For example, the director of JPL of NASA, Michael Watkins, said about it:

“Every landing on Mars is discouraging, but now with InSight safe on the surface, we can do a unique kind of science on Mars.”

The InSight mission has been a success for NASA, but it will also be a success for science and to know much more about the solar system.

By Demian Bayley Dominguez for NBI News
with information from the NASA press release on Nasa.gov

Photo:

NASA’s InSight Mars lander acquired this image of the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC). This image was acquired on Nov. 26, 2018, Sol 0 of the InSight mission where the local mean solar time for the image exposures was 13:34:21. Each ICC image has a field of view of 124 x 124 degrees.
Credits: Courtesy of NASA/JPL-CalTech
NBI News